The great advantage of freelance writing is that it can be done either in conjunction with another career, or as a career in itself. It can also be a very well paid profession, whether part-time or full-time. This course is an ideal starting point and covers the whole field of modern freelance writing. Flexible in its approach, it is geared to the specific needs of each individual writer.

The course is flexible and allows you to concentrate on the areas of writing that interest you most. It concentrates on setting the fundamental writing skills required of any freelance writer, and once that is done, provides specialist tuition for those wishing to write travel pieces, drawing on the experience and knowledge of successful travel writers. You will learn what is required to create business opportunities and focus on the commercial aspects of the industry.

Achieving this qualification

To be awarded this qualification, learners are required to successfully achieve 15 mandatory units.

  • Unit 01 - Starting Out
  • Unit 02 - Readers and Markets
  • Unit 03 - What is News?
  • Unit 04 - Writing Features
  • Unit 05 - More about Features
  • Unit 06 - Before you Specialise
  • Unit 07 - Directing your Writing
  • Unit 08 - Journalists and the Law
  • Unit 09 - Sourcing Ideas and Putting them together
  • Unit 10 - Travel Writing - an Overview
  • Unit 11 - Bringing your Work to the Market-place
  • Unit 12 - The Heart of good Travel Writing
  • Unit 13 - Other Markets
  • Unit 14 - Television and Radio
  • Unit 15 - Going it Alone
Total Qualification Time (TQT) - 600
Guided Learning Hours (GLH) - 300

Candidate entry requirements

London Media Academy does not set entry requirements for these qualifications. However, centres must ensure that candidates have the potential and opportunity to gain the qualifications successfully.

London Media Academy cannot accept any registrations for candidates under 16 as these qualifications are not approved for under 16s.

Resource requirements

Staff delivering these qualifications must be able to demonstrate that they meet the following occupational expertise requirements. They should:

  • Be occupationally competent or technically knowledgeable in the areas for which they are delivering training and/or have experience of providing training. This knowledge must be to the same level as the training being delivered
  • Have recent relevant experience in the specific area they will be assessing
  • Have credible experience of providing training.

How the qualification is assessed

Assessment is the process of measuring a candidate’s skill, knowledge and understanding against the standards set in a qualification. The Level 3 Diploma in Photography is internally assessed.

Internal assessment

Each candidate must create a portfolio of evidence which demonstrates achievement of all the learning outcomes and assessment criteria associated with each unit. On completion of each unit candidates must declare that the work produced is their own. The Assessor must countersign this. Examples of suitable evidence for the portfolio for each unit are provided in the Handbook.

The main pieces of evidence for the portfolio could include (in no particular order):

  • Assessor observation – completed observational checklists and related action plans
  • witness testimony
  • candidate’s proof of work
  • worksheets
  • assignments/projects/reports
  • record of professional discussion
  • record of oral and written questioning
  • candidate and peer reports
  • Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL).

Prior learning and other requirements

There are no prior learning or other requirements for these qualifications.

Language of assessment

Assessment of these qualifications will be available in French only. All student work must be in French.

Moderation

Moderation is the process by which we confirm that assessment decisions in centres are:

We do this through:

external moderation – which we carry out through our External Moderators who, by supporting you, will make sure that assessments meet nationally agreed standards and that your quality assurance systems continue to meet our centre approval criteria.

This qualification is designed to give a basic understanding of how to create web content as well as in-depth training in the art of being a freelance supplier to the web.

The course begins with a basic introduction to the web and then deals with the basics of freelance writing. not just with a web-centric viewpoint. Some law knowledge follows and then finally the specific and separate functions of the internet based freelance writer are covered with specific reference to how best to use social media.

Achieving this qualification

To be awarded this qualification, learners are required to successfully achieve 12 mandatory units.

  • Unit 01 - An introduction to web writing
  • Unit 02 - Online journalism
  • Unit 03 - Writing for the web
  • Unit 04 - Readers and markets
  • Unit 05 - Directing your writing
  • Unit 06 - Freelancing on the web
  • Unit 07 - Journalists and the law
  • Unit 08 - Citizen journalism, blogs, vlogs and podcasts
  • Unit 09 - Google and social media
  • Unit 10 - Online editing
  • Unit 11 - Online layout and design
  • Unit 12 - Successful web packages
Total Qualification Time (TQT) - 480
Guided Learning Hours (GLH) - 240

Candidate entry requirements

London Media Academy does not set entry requirements for these qualifications. However, centres must ensure that candidates have the potential and opportunity to gain the qualifications successfully.

London Media Academy cannot accept any registrations for candidates under 16 as these qualifications are not approved for under 16s.

Resource requirements

Staff delivering these qualifications must be able to demonstrate that they meet the following occupational expertise requirements. They should:

  • Be occupationally competent or technically knowledgeable in the areas for which they are delivering training and/or have experience of providing training. This knowledge must be to the same level as the training being delivered
  • Have recent relevant experience in the specific area they will be assessing
  • Have credible experience of providing training.

How the qualification is assessed

Assessment is the process of measuring a candidate’s skill, knowledge and understanding against the standards set in a qualification. The Level 3 Diploma in Photography is internally assessed.

Internal assessment

Each candidate must create a portfolio of evidence which demonstrates achievement of all the learning outcomes and assessment criteria associated with each unit. On completion of each unit candidates must declare that the work produced is their own. The Assessor must countersign this. Examples of suitable evidence for the portfolio for each unit are provided in the Handbook.

The main pieces of evidence for the portfolio could include (in no particular order):

  • Assessor observation – completed observational checklists and related action plans
  • witness testimony
  • candidate’s proof of work
  • worksheets
  • assignments/projects/reports
  • record of professional discussion
  • record of oral and written questioning
  • candidate and peer reports
  • Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL).

Moderation

Moderation is the process by which we confirm that assessment decisions in centres are:

We do this through:

external moderation – which we carry out through our External Moderators who, by supporting you, will make sure that assessments meet nationally agreed standards and that your quality assurance systems continue to meet our centre approval criteria.

This course will train you in a whole range of skills, all of which are required for a successful career as a staff journalist. You will learn the techniques of interviewing and reporting through the practical experience of your assignments as well as writing an intro, feature and editorial articles, profiles, and handouts.

You will see how to handle a running story, understand the importance of house style, basic 'subbing', creating headlines and captions, and presenting copy. It also gives a thorough grounding in the theory and practice of newsroom techniques, as well as covering in detail the legal and ethical aspects required.

Achieving this qualification

To be awarded this qualification, learners are required to successfully achieve 16 mandatory units.

  • Unit 01 - Starting Out in Journalism
  • Unit 02 - What is News?
  • Unit 03 - The Junior Reporter
  • Unit 04 - The Senior Reporter
  • Unit 05 - Filing Copy
  • Unit 06 - The Evening Papers
  • Unit 07 - The Nationals
  • Unit 08 - Journalists and the Law
  • Unit 09 - Writing Features
  • Unit 10 - More About Features
  • Unit 11 - Specialist Writing
  • Unit 12 - Specialist Writing 2
  • Unit 13 - The Qualified Journalist
  • Unit 14 - Subediting and Design
  • Unit 15 - Television and Radio
  • Unit 16 - The Editor's Chair
Total Qualification Time (TQT) - 640
Guided Learning Hours (GLH) - 320

Candidate entry requirements

London Media Academy does not set entry requirements for these qualifications. However, centres must ensure that candidates have the potential and opportunity to gain the qualifications successfully.

London Media Academy cannot accept any registrations for candidates under 16 as these qualifications are not approved for under 16s.

Resource requirements

Staff delivering these qualifications must be able to demonstrate that they meet the following occupational expertise requirements. They should:

  • Be occupationally competent or technically knowledgeable in the areas for which they are delivering training and/or have experience of providing training. This knowledge must be to the same level as the training being delivered
  • Have recent relevant experience in the specific area they will be assessing
  • Have credible experience of providing training.

How the qualification is assessed

Assessment is the process of measuring a candidate’s skill, knowledge and understanding against the standards set in a qualification. The Level 3 Diploma in Photography is internally assessed.

Internal assessment

Each candidate must create a portfolio of evidence which demonstrates achievement of all the learning outcomes and assessment criteria associated with each unit. On completion of each unit candidates must declare that the work produced is their own. The Assessor must countersign this. Examples of suitable evidence for the portfolio for each unit are provided in the Handbook.

The main pieces of evidence for the portfolio could include (in no particular order):

  • Assessor observation – completed observational checklists and related action plans
  • witness testimony
  • candidate’s proof of work
  • worksheets
  • assignments/projects/reports
  • record of professional discussion
  • record of oral and written questioning
  • candidate and peer reports
  • Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)

Moderation

Moderation is the process by which we confirm that assessment decisions in centres are:

We do this through:

external moderation – which we carry out through our External Moderators who, by supporting you, will make sure that assessments meet nationally agreed standards and that your quality assurance systems continue to meet our centre approval criteria.